Justice for John Morland and Kris Jarvis

The issue:
 
John Morland and Kris Jarvis were tragically killed in Purley by a reckless driver who was already disqualified from driving, without insurance, in a vehicle taken without consent, was more than two and a half times over the alcohol blood limit, had taken cocaine in the previous 24 hours and was driving at 70 miles per hour in a 30-zone whilst being pursued by police. John and Kris’s killer received just 10 years in prison for his crimes.
 
Alok is now working with Kris and Jon’s fiancées Tracey Fidler and Hayley Lindsay to toughen up sentencing for those convicted of death by dangerous driving.
 
Achievements to date:
 
  • Alok welcomed an announcement made in May 2014 that the Government would hold a review of all driving related offences and sentences.
  • Alok held a Parliamentary debate on dangerous driving in November 2014 and secured a commitment from the responding Minister that the Government would hold an extensive public consultation on the issue of sentencing.
  • Alok organised a meeting between Tracey and Hayley and the Minister for Criminal Justice. During the meeting, Mike Penning agreed to ensure that the views expressed by Tracey and Hayley were fed into the Review of driving offences and penalties.
  • Alok organised a meeting for Tracey and Hayley with Prime Minister David Cameron. The Prime Minister agreed to write to the Justice Secretary asking him to consider ways that prison sentences for causing multiple road deaths could be extended.
  • A petition set up by Tracey and Hayley which called on the Government to introduce consecutive sentencing for each person killed by a dangerous driver received more than 100,000 signatures.
  • Alok held a Westminster Hall debate in September 2015 and called on the government to toughen the sentencing regime for those who kill through dangerous driving. After the debate Minister Andrew Selous MP met with Tracey, Hayley and Alok to hear their personal views on the matter.
  • The Ministry of Justice launched a consultation seeking views on whether the current maximum penalties available to the courts should be increased. Alok’s letter to the Minister for Prisons, Sam Gyimah, can be read on his website.
  • Alok organised a meeting between Tracey and Haley and the Minister for Prisons, Sam Gyimah, to discuss stronger sentences for dangerous driving and the recent consultation on driving offences held by the Ministry of Justice.
Next steps:
  • Alok will continue to help Tracey and Hayley in their campaign to toughen sentences for those who are convicted of death by dangerous driving.
 
Alok says:
 
“I am pleased that the government are listening carefully to the argument for needing tougher sentences for those who kill through dangerous driving and I will continue to work with Tracey and Hayley to change the law so that sentences properly reflect the crime committed.”